Food Gardening

Collards

Brassica oleracea var. acephala Collards are a mainstay of Southern vegetable gardens. The cool-season leafy vegetable is a super cold-hardy member of the cabbage family. Collards tolerate both warm and cold temperatures better than cabbage – in fact, collards are...

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Black Walnut

Juglans nigraBlack Walnut is native to North America and does well in the South in well-drained soil. Few gardeners plant them purposely but many may find one growing on property they purchase or inherit. • More detailed information can be...

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Peanut

Arachis hypogaea Peanuts, sometimes called goober peas, pindars, earth nuts, and ground nuts, are among the richest vegetables for oil content. They grow in a most unique way: When the single-stem, bushy plants are mature, their low-growing branches produce yellow...

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Pecan

Carya illinoensis The Pecan is a member of the Walnut genus but is more closely related to Hickories than Walnuts. Pecans were used by Native Americans at least 8000 years ago in Texas. • More detailed information can be found...

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Black Walnut – Cracking

Q: I have a black walnut tree in my yard that has dropped copious amounts of nuts this fall. Is there an easy way to get the nut meats out of the hard shells? A: There is a small depression...

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Lemongrass

Cymbopogon citrates taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Tender perennial. A native of India, Lemongrass grows in clumps 4 to 6 feet high. Leaves have a fragrance resembling the scent of lemons....

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Mint

Mentha spp. taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Mints are easily grown perennial ground covers that are valued as flavorings in teas, ice cream, candies and gum. There are many varieties, each...

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Angelica

Angelica archangelica Angelica is a tall biennial plant that acquired the name from its supposed ability to prevent or cure plague. People considered it a “guardian angel.” All parts of the plant are aromatic. Use the leaves in salads, add...

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Anise

Pimpinella anisum Many herbs, including anise, are members of the Umbelliferae family. Anise is a native of the Mediterranean area and has been used as a flavoring and as a medicinal there for centuries. It has a flavor similar to...

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Anise Hyssop

Agastache foeniculum Anise hyssop is a large perennial plant, a member of the mint family, with showy purple spikes that attract bees in abundance. The flavor and aroma are definitely licorice. The leaves are good for teas or garnishes. •...

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Basil

Ocimum basilicum A very familiar and popular herb, Basil is the basis for pesto. Many cooks consider Basil the premier culinary herb. Every gardener needs at least 1 Basil plant to have the fresh leaves to toss into casseroles, sauces...

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Caraway

Carum carvi Gardeners like caraway for the seeds, for the foliage and for the roots, which are used like parsnips. Caraway joins carrots, parsnips, angelica and anise as members of the Umbelliferae family. • More detailed information can be found...

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Chamomile, German

Chamaemelum nobile, Matricaria recutita Chamomile, sometimes called Roman chamomile, is a low-growing 4 to 6-inch tall perennial. German chamomile is a tall, erect, 3-foot annual. Both chamomiles are members of the composite (daisy) family and the flowers of both are...

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Chives

Allium schoenoprasum taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Bookby Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Chives are perennial plants belonging to the Onion family that produce foot-tall clumps of hollow, upright leaves. Allowed to go to flower, they make mounds...

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Sage

Salvia officinalis taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Sage is a hardy, semi-woody perennial plant that makes a loose shrub about 2 feet tall. The leaves are harvested and used fresh or...

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Parsley

Petroselinum crispum taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Virtually everyone recognizes Parsley, a frequently-appearing garnish on plates served in restaurants. Parsley leaves are also used in various dishes, soups and sauces. Cooks...

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Chestnut

Castanea spp. American Chestnut once grew throughout the Northeast, Midwest and Southern mountains. Farmers depended on the nuts to feed their families and livestock and they were a major part of forest animals’ diet. The rot-resistant lumber was used for...

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Salad Burnet

Sanguisorba minor taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Salad burnet is a graceful perennial plant that forms a 15inch mound of compound leaves. The leaves taste and smell like fresh cucumbers and...

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