Vegetables

Onions and Leeks – Home Garden

Growing Onions and Leeks in the Home Garden by Orin Martin taken from the Center for Agroecology & Sustainable Food Systems newsletter zzyx.ucsc.edu/casfs/community/20.2.pdf Over time the genus Allium, which includes onions, leeks, and garlic, has been variously listed under the...

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Tomato – Early Blight

Most tomato gardeners have seen the symptoms: lower leaves turn bright yellow then drop off the plant. As the season progresses most leaves may drop off the tomato vines, leading to sunscald of fruit if any form. On ripening fruit,...

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Tomato

Lycopersicon lycopersicum Tomatoes are unquestionably the most popular garden vegetables in the United States. The flavor of a newly picked red tomato from your garden easily surpasses that of premium, greenhouse-grown fruit and no other vegetable comes close to producing...

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Squash – Pollination

Gardeners growing yellow squash and zucchini may notice that many blooms come on the plant early but fall off without forming fruit. Members of the cucurbit family (melons, squash, pumpkins, gourds) have separate male and female blooms on each plant....

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Potato

Solanum tuberosum The potato ranks with rice and wheat as one of the world’s leading food crops. It is the number one vegetable crop, grown in nearly every country of the world. The potato is actually a shortened stem called...

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Spinach

Spinacia oleracea Spinach is probably native to southwest Asia. Gardeners have cultivated it for centuries as a salad green and cooked vegetable. Even though many youngsters are dissuaded by early experiences with boiled spinach, most adults eventually appreciate its diversity...

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Pea, Southern

Vigna unguiculata To a Southerner, “peas” means blackeyed, not English. Also known as field pea, cowpea, and protopea – or just plain Southern pea – these high-protein bean relatives come in a huge array of pod and seed color, size,...

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Sorrel

Rumex acetosa (scutatus) Sorrel, commonly called garden sorrel, produces leaves with a sharp, lemony flavor. A high oxalic acid content, which may be troublesome for persons subject to gout, causes the sharpness. • More detailed information can be found in...

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Squash

Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita mixta Squashes are warm-season vine crops with flavorful flesh. The many types are divided into summer squash, grown for the immature fruit, and winter squash, which is harvested mature. • More detailed information...

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Asparagus

Asparagus officinalis Asparagus is a cool-climate perennial plant that is fairly well adapted to all but the hottest areas of the South. Its tender spears, which arise from the crowns in the spring, make it an appetizing product of the...

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Mustard Greens

Brassica juncea This leafy relative of cabbage and collards is grown early in the season and also as a fall crop. Mustard, close in popularity to collards and turnips, is an important green vegetable in southern gardens and one of...

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Lettuce

Lactuca sativa No other salad crop is grown or used in such large quantities as lettuce, which has become an essential part of salads. Lettuce is a cool-weather crop that can be grown in spring or fall. Hot weather causes...

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Pepper

Capsicum annuum, Capsicum chinense, Capsicum frutescens Peppers are available in so many types and varieties that most gardeners stick to a few types that they will use in their recipes. The most familiar peppers are the bells: green-red, yellow, purple-lilac,...

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Chinese Cabbage

Brassica rapa var. pekinensis Chinese cabbage is another of the cole crops, cultivated in China for 1,500 years. Its mild taste (compared to regular cabbage) makes it excellent when eaten fresh, steamed, or as “stir fry.” • More detailed information...

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Kale

Brassica oleracea Kale is a cool-season cooking green used similarly to collards (most Southerners prefer collards in taste). Seed in late summer or very early spring. • This information can be found in The Georgia Fruit & Vegetable Book by...

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Rhubarb

Rheum rhabarbarum Rhubarb is not a “traditional” Southern vegetable, though many cooks look forward to harvesting the leaf stems from this cool-season perennial plants for making pies, sauces, custards, and Because of its intensely bitter flavor, they usually combine it...

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Radish

Raphanus sativus Radishes are fast-growing, cool-weather vegetables. They grow any place they can have some sun and moist, fertile soil. They do well in gardens, pots, planters, flower beds, and cold frames. Some people grow them in boxes of sand...

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Pumpkin

Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita mixta Pumpkins are much-loved decorations for the fall, but many people grow these warm-season vine crops for their flavorful flesh and for their seeds too. Actually, pumpkins are winter squashes, picked when they...

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