Landscaping

Hydrangeas – Pruning Late

Even though July is the preferred month to prune bigleaf hydrangeas, sometimes circumstances intervene to keep you from doing what should be done. If that is the case, don’t despair. Hydrangeas can still be pruned after August… but more carefully...

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Hydrangea – Changing Flower Colors

“Lime makes ‘em pink, sulfur makes ‘em blue,” or is it the other way around? Indeed, adding lime to the soil around the common French hydrangea will make the plant change flower color from blue to pink. The lime counteracts...

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Hydrangea ‘Lady in Red’

Few shrubs have caused the excitement engendered by ‘Lady in Red’ hydrangea. It is a patented selection of an Asian hydrangea which has maroon leaves, red stems and a red lace-cap flower. For more information see: ‘Lady in Red’...

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Holly – Pollination

I spoke at a training meeting for nursery personnel recently and was inundated with questions about how hollies pollinate. The folks knew that hollies have male and female plants, and that only the females bear berries. They wondered, though, if...

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Hibiscus – Identification

Each year I receive several questions  regarding hibiscus. Tropical hibiscus owners want to know how to bring their plants indoors for the winter and have many concerns about keeping them healthy. Confederate rose growers want to know how to root...

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Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick

Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick is the folk name of contorted filbert, Corylus avellana L. ‘Contorta’ These notes were contributed by B. J. Thomas, who found this information on E-bay: Sir Harry Lauder (1870-1950 ) Sir Harry Lauder, the popular singer...

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Gardenia – When to Prune

Gardenias can often get too large for their spot. Their flowers are so beautiful and fragrant, many gardeners don’t want to do anything that retards blooming. These notes from Ted Stephens at Nurseries Caroliniana, Inc. should help: “Gardenias flower on...

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Daphne – Special Soil

The smell from the daphne shrubs growing near my front door has been intoxicating this year. I have two there, in front of three small gardenias, assuring my family of a perfumed entry each day for months. I have three...

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Crapemyrtle, Crape Myrtle, Crepe Myrtle – Which is Correct?

When I exhorted my radio listeners to check out my web pages on how to prune crapemyrtles, several sent plaintive notes that they simply could not find the correct pages on my website. The reason is that I spell the...

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Crapemyrtle Pruning – Steve Pettis’ Comments

I like the description here. Dr. Ed Gillman describes pollarding at his site linked here that “Pollarding is an old technique for maintaining trees at a small size. It has proven itself as a reliable, durable method of maintaining trees...

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Crapemyrtle Pruning – Art Morris’ Comments

I think we all agree that the preferable treatment for a crape is to plant in the right place and let it go. Pollarding is intended to remove only the annual sprouts from a pollard head, and is done correctly...

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Crapemyrtle Pruning – Shannon Pable’s Comments

“Here’s how I look at it: “For pollarding, you cut above the last pollarded cut; i.e. cut the newer wood and avoid cutting into the older wood…leaving some existing lateral branching. By cutting into the older wood you would increase...

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Crapemyrtle Cultivars

Crape myrtles are one of the most beautiful and carefree flowering plants of the Southern landscape. There are many different cultivars, with different flower colors and growing heights. This publication from the University of Georgia gives information on crape myrtle...

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Crapemyrtle – Pruned Poorly – Pictures

A poorly-pruned crapemyrtle is one where the top has been thoughtlessly hacked back to a...

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Crapemyrtle – Pruned Correctly – Pictures

In my view, a well-pruned crapemyrtle has architectural form and a graceful...

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Boxwood – Warts on Stem

Not long ago I discussed the symptoms of boxwood leaf miners. If your boxwood leaves do not have the characteristic reddish-yellow mottling caused by the miner, what else could cause a thinning, unhealthy shrub? Taft Eaker runs the homeowner landscape...

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Boxwood – Varieties

In the nursery trade there are basically two species of Boxwood available, English Boxwood (Buxus sempervirens) and Japanese Boxwood (Buxus microphylla). English Boxwood is native to southern Europe, northern Africa and western Asia and sometimes is referred to as Common...

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Bamboo – Clumping

A reader recently asked me “Is there a recommended clumping bamboo for Atlanta? I need one that grows to sixteen feet or more.” Though it grows tall like a tree, bamboo is actually a giant grass. It spreads by means...

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