Landscaping

Lantana – Pruning

Winter lantana care simultaneously exemplifies the mystical pleasure and the aching frustration of gardening. Most lantana varieties are a bit too tender to survive a winter north of Atlanta. ‘New Gold’, in particular, seems to have a death wish every...

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Lantana – Cultivars

Lantana has become a ubiquitous part of the colorful summer landscape. And with good reason! Here is an article describing its habit. Texas A&M:...

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Hosta – Identifying

Identifying plants is always a challenge. Some, like hosta, have hundreds of varieties. Judy Burns, from the Georgia Hosta Society, sends this note: “At the hosta show last weekend I had a number of folks tell me that they would...

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Hosta – Diseases and Pests

Hosta are one of the most common landscape plants. Yet they are affected their fair share of diseases and pests. If you have hostas, this publication from The University of Georgia and The University of Iowa will help diagnose any...

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Holland – A Great Vacation for Gardeners!

I recently was invited by the Netherlands Board of Tourism and the Netherlands Flower Bulb Information Center to travel to Holland to see the glory of their flowers in spring. I was not disappointed! Mile after mile of tulip fields!...

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History of Knock Out® Rose

William Radler Develops Hybrids That Are Knockouts By STEWART DEMPSEY From the July 9, 2006 edition of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel It is hard to imagine a garden without roses. Their captivating beauty and lore are entwined in the hearts...

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Geranium – Overwintering

Recently I was asked how to store dahlias and caladiums for the winter. Let’s continue the discussion and focus on another plant that is not reliably winter-hardy but which can be kept with a bit of effort. The bright red...

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Flowery Branch – Origin of Name

When I wondered how Flowery Branch GA got its name, Bob C. was quick to respond: Chartered in 1874, this little town is one of the oldest in Hall County. It was first called Anaguluskee, a Cherokee Indian word meaning...

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Earth Kind Roses – List

In January 2002, at the conclusion of the first 5-year research study, Texas A&M had identified 11 cultivars which not only survived but also produced outstanding results in southern gardens. Those 11 cultivars are: Sea Foam – a creamy white...

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David Austin Roses for The South

Cyndi Lauderdale, executive director of the Wilson Botanical Gardens, and a North Carolina Extension Service agent, has found that several English rose cultivars grow well in the hot and humid Southeast. Writing in The American Nurseryman, she presents these notes:...

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Crapemyrtle – Failure to Bloom

Few things are as frustrating as having a plant that is known for its beautiful flowers fail to bloom. Worse yet is when your neighbors’ plants are in full flower while identical ones in your landscape sullenly produce only foliage....

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Buttonbush

Q: Along a creek bed near Yatesville, Georgia, I came upon a low growing plant with a pretty white flower that I cannot identify. The bloom was a little smaller than a golf ball. It looked like tiny honeysuckle blooms...

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Fragrant Plants

I don’t think I appreciated the value of landscape fragrance until the last few years in my garden. I was delighted a few weeks ago when I discovered, by nose alone, a newly blooming gardenia. Here is a list of...

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Virginia copperleaf – Identification

Q: What is this weed in my garden? A: It’s Virginia copperleaf, Acalypha virginica.  It is an annual weed, which means it can be prevented with the proper pre-emergent chemical. The best pre-emergent for broadleaf weeds is dithiopyr (click for sources). Apply the chemical in...

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Corn Poppy – Identification and History

Arty’s Garden Corn Poppy – The Poppy of Memorial Day The corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas) gets its name because it commonly grows amid fields of cereal grains such as wheat or oats – sometimes referred to as “corn” in England,...

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Coneflower – Odd-looking Flowers (Phytoplasma)

For whatever reason, homeowners in 2004 noticed many more instances of “odd” coneflowers than in previous years. The most common description is that the central “cone” of the flower is misshapen or that it has tiny flower growing from it....

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Colocasia vs. Alocasia vs. Xanthosoma

All are called elephant ear by gardeners. Some are edible and some are not. Following is a collection of identification tips taken from various websites. I found the most useful to be http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/shade_gardening/95670 and http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1342/ Alocasia: leaves are held horizontally,...

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Castor Bean – Ricin

With all the news about ricin poison being used by terrorists, I thought I’d show a few pictures of the castor bean plant, Ricinus communis, itself. Many folks in the South grow it. Castor bean leaves make a dramatic tropical...

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