An Iranian plant? Note flower & seed pods

« Back to Name that Plant

Date Photo Taken: 11/29/2012
Location: Houston, TX
Posted By: stevejolly

Notes:

A neighbor’s plant. He says it’s from a friend who brought it from Iran. Can grow quite wide, rising 4 feet or so high. Flowers are on stalks (photo shows one not yet open); the stalk falls sideways away from the plant and leaves pods on the ground that will root. It also sends out shoots underground that grow new plants very close to the original one. Pix show one that is 20 or more years old (note recent stalk & pods on ground at lower left), and a 2-year potted plant just beginning to flower.

COMMENTS

  1. Walter Reeves The Georgia Gardener says:

    It reminds me of walking iris but I don’t think that’s what it is.

    December 2nd, 2012 at 9:55 am
  2. stone Unregistered says:

    Looks like crinum americanum.
    While there are crinums that send out runners, most produce offsets, and this one sets large seed which come up reliably.

    December 3rd, 2012 at 12:25 pm
  3. rpaul Unregistered says:

    Looks like a crinum, maybe crinum asiaticum?
    http://www.wildsingapore.com/wildfacts/plants/coastal/crinum/asiaticum.htm

    December 3rd, 2012 at 2:55 pm
  4. stevejolly Registered says:

    Does this photo with open flowers help identify it?

    December 4th, 2012 at 2:29 pm
  5. stevejolly Registered says:

    Ah-hah! Thanks rpaul, for the link to the Crinum asiaticum photos. As you’ll see in my upload, today, the open flowers here look absolutely identical (at least, to me!) to those in the pix at the “wildsingapore.com” site. Of course, I may well be missing something that’s obvious to the rest of you, so I’ll await feedback.

    December 4th, 2012 at 3:21 pm
  6. stevejolly Registered says:

    So, especially after looking at several other websites with extensive photos of c. asiaticum — and comparing my “seed pod” to the clusters of fruit shown — I’m concluding that I have some seashore spider lilies.

    My friend’s home is being demolished and I wanted to save some samples of this unusual plant, in case it turned out to be a bit rare. So, I grew several of ‘em from seeds found on the ground, which, three years later, have led to the photos posted here (and four pots of happy young seashore spider lilies!). Good outcome. And, again, my thanks to all of you.

    December 4th, 2012 at 3:42 pm

Leave a Reply