Native Plants?

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Date Photo Taken: July 6, 2011
Location: Roswell, GA
Posted By: gmkoza

Notes:

A friend gave me some plants that she purchased from the Georgia Native Plant society and could not remember what they were. Could you please identify them for me? Thanks so much!

COMMENTS

  1. Southern Garden Coach Flower Fanatic says:

    The top photo is Ruellia, or Mexican Petunia. This plant is semi-aquatic and can be grown in shallow water of a pond, if you desire. It’s a summer annual, so don’t expect it to survive the winter. The bottom photo looks like purple basil, but I’m not as certain about that one. Try plucking a leaf, crushing it slightly, then smell the results. Does it smell like basil? Perhaps folks who are into herbs can help us ID this one.

    July 9th, 2011 at 7:54 am
  2. DJ Unregistered says:

    From the photo, I cannot tell whether the leaves are opposite or alternate. If opposite- the plant may be opal basil.

    July 9th, 2011 at 12:35 pm
  3. Gail Registered says:

    Good Morning, Thank you so much for all your information. What a shame that the Mexican Petunia is only an annual because it is lovely. Maybe a ton of mulching over the winter might spare it?

    The purple plant when crushed does not smell like basil but more like a citrus or mint…

    Thanks again!

    July 11th, 2011 at 10:18 am
  4. Sunnysue Unregistered says:

    I find that the purple basil has a strong licorice scent. Makes a great flavored vinegar for salad dressing and it’s a lovely pink color to boot. If you don’t want a ton of these plants next year, you will need to deadhead the blooms though.

    July 12th, 2011 at 5:44 pm
  5. Sunnysue Unregistered says:

    I find that the purple basil has a strong licorice scent. Makes a great flavored vinegar for salad dressing and it’s a lovely pink color to boot. If you don’t want a ton of these plants next year, you will need to deadhead the blooms though.
    On the Mexican petunia, I had one come back for 5 years in a row. Sadly, I thought it was a perennial until the sixth year.
    With lots of water and Miracle Grow it was about 4-5 feet tall and covered with blooms. It is considered to be a danger to our environment though.
    http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/parks/mexican_petunia.html

    July 12th, 2011 at 5:48 pm
  6. stone Unregistered says:

    The purple plant is a perilla.
    http://www.plantoftheweek.org/week427.shtml

    The mexican petunia is a perennial in my garden, tolerating the drought conditions in the dry sand hills without a drop of extra water. The only problems I have with that ruellia are the deer eat it, and those stolons mean that it is an invader that is unsuitable to most flower beds.

    July 22nd, 2011 at 8:07 am
  7. Gail Registered says:

    Thank you for your replies. I will keep an eye on the Mexican Petunia to see if it survives the winter. I will have to try to used the Perilla as a replacement for Basil. It certainly is a beautiful and showy plant among my herbs.

    July 23rd, 2011 at 8:21 am
  8. lynda Unregistered says:

    Just cut the dead stems off of the petunias and they will return in the spring. They will take over your beds if you are not careful. I have a ton . Mine were about 5ft tall this last year and they get bigger each year.
    Columbus ,Ga

    March 8th, 2012 at 1:10 pm

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