Featured Article

Come With Me to Holland for the 2015 Tulip Festival!

This is going to be amazing! I have worked with my long-time tour company operators, Earthbound Expeditions, to charter a river cruise boat in late April, 2015 during the height of the tulip festival in Amsterdam! We will, of course, visit the Keukenhof Gardens, the world famous 79 acre flower park....

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Weeds – Identification with Pictures

Weed control in the landscape is a tough business. You have to know a lot about the weed in question just to get started! As in most situations, a picture is worth a thousand words. Go through the sites below, then choose your method of weed control. Remember: healthy, vigorous...

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“English Ivy Kills Trees” Sign – Who Places Them?

OK – my curiosity is killing me! Who puts up these signs at random spots around Atlanta? I’ve asked a number of arborists: No knowledge. I’ve posted it on Facebook; 21,000 people saw the post: lots of comments, but no answer. If you know, please email me! Debbi D. comments...

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Come With Me to Cuba – Oct 2014

I get real pleasure from travelling with folks who like to see the world. Going to Callaway Gardens was a real trip when I was a kid! Now I get to see the corners of the globe with gardeners (and spouses!) on trips I plan and host each year. In...

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UGA Vegetable Gardening Publications

With food prices high, folks have been thinking about growing some of their own food. Food gardening is not hard and it doesn’t have to take much room in your landscape. You can even do it in containers! These gardening publications are available on the Internet or ask for a...

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  • RECENT ARTICLES
  • POPULAR ARTICLES
  • Heirloom Tomatoes – Sources

    Georgia regulations make it tough for growers outside the state to ship live tomato plants into our state. You can grow tomatoes from seed, but many gardeners don’t want to go through the hassle of planning and caretaking. Fortunately, there...

    READ MORE

  • Jerusalem Artichoke (sunchoke)

    Helianthus tuberosus This tall, fall-flowering perennial sunflower is native to the United States, and was used by native Americans used it as a staple food. It grows into a somewhat invasive mass of stalks up to ten feet tall, with...

    READ MORE

  • Swiss Chard

    Beta vulgaris var. cicla Chard, more commonly called Swiss chard, is actually a beet that has been bred for leaves at the expense of the bulbous roots. Grown as a summer green, it is prepared like spinach. • More detailed...

    READ MORE

  • Corn, Sweet

    Zea mays var. rugosa Who can resist a steaming hot ear of fresh-grown corn on the cob? Being a native crop, it is more American as apple pie. Sweet corn was developed from common field corn. Field corn is harvested...

    READ MORE

  • Cucumber

    Cucumis sativus Cucumbers are vine crops that are closely related to squashes, pumpkins, and melons. They are warm-season plants known for their refreshingly mild fruits. Many kinds of cucumbers have been developed to satisfy the demands of different cuisines. Some...

    READ MORE

  • Collards

    Brassica oleracea var. acephala Collards are a mainstay of Southern vegetable gardens. The cool-season leafy vegetable is a super cold-hardy member of the cabbage family. Collards tolerate both warm and cold temperatures better than cabbage – in fact, collards are...

    READ MORE

  • Cauliflower

    Brassica oleracea var. botrytis A member of the mustard family, cauliflower and its close relatives are different varieties of Brassica oleracea, commonly called the cole crops. • More detailed information can be found in The Georgia Fruit & Vegetable Book...

    READ MORE

  • Black Walnut

    Juglans nigraBlack Walnut is native to North America and does well in the South in well-drained soil. Few gardeners plant them purposely but many may find one growing on property they purchase or inherit. • More detailed information can be...

    READ MORE

  • Peanut

    Arachis hypogaea Peanuts, sometimes called goober peas, pindars, earth nuts, and ground nuts, are among the richest vegetables for oil content. They grow in a most unique way: When the single-stem, bushy plants are mature, their low-growing branches produce yellow...

    READ MORE

  • Pecan

    Carya illinoensis The Pecan is a member of the Walnut genus but is more closely related to Hickories than Walnuts. Pecans were used by Native Americans at least 8000 years ago in Texas. • More detailed information can be found...

    READ MORE

  • Black Walnut – Cracking

    Q: I have a black walnut tree in my yard that has dropped copious amounts of nuts this fall. Is there an easy way to get the nut meats out of the hard shells? A: There is a small depression...

    READ MORE

  • Lemongrass

    Cymbopogon citrates taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Tender perennial. A native of India, Lemongrass grows in clumps 4 to 6 feet high. Leaves have a fragrance resembling the scent of lemons....

    READ MORE

  • Mint

    Mentha spp. taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Mints are easily grown perennial ground covers that are valued as flavorings in teas, ice cream, candies and gum. There are many varieties, each...

    READ MORE

  • Angelica

    Angelica archangelica Angelica is a tall biennial plant that acquired the name from its supposed ability to prevent or cure plague. People considered it a “guardian angel.” All parts of the plant are aromatic. Use the leaves in salads, add...

    READ MORE

  • Anise

    Pimpinella anisum Many herbs, including anise, are members of the Umbelliferae family. Anise is a native of the Mediterranean area and has been used as a flavoring and as a medicinal there for centuries. It has a flavor similar to...

    READ MORE

  • Anise Hyssop

    Agastache foeniculum Anise hyssop is a large perennial plant, a member of the mint family, with showy purple spikes that attract bees in abundance. The flavor and aroma are definitely licorice. The leaves are good for teas or garnishes. •...

    READ MORE

  • Basil

    Ocimum basilicum A very familiar and popular herb, Basil is the basis for pesto. Many cooks consider Basil the premier culinary herb. Every gardener needs at least 1 Basil plant to have the fresh leaves to toss into casseroles, sauces...

    READ MORE

  • Caraway

    Carum carvi Gardeners like caraway for the seeds, for the foliage and for the roots, which are used like parsnips. Caraway joins carrots, parsnips, angelica and anise as members of the Umbelliferae family. • More detailed information can be found...

    READ MORE

  • Weeds – Identification with Pictures

    Weed control in the landscape is a tough business. You have to know a lot about the weed in question just to get started! As in most situations, a picture is worth a thousand words. Go through the sites below,...

    READ MORE

  • Diagnosing Holes in the Yard

    Sometimes many heads are better than one when it comes to solving a problem. Wade Hutcheson, my Extension colleague in Spalding county, gets plenty of calls from the citizens of his area asking his help in identifying various holes in...

    READ MORE

  • Brown Patch – Diagnosing

    You have brown patches of dead grass in your lawn. Is it the common lawn disease ‘brown patch’ or is it something else? The answer is important: if it is brown patch you probably need to spray with a fungicide....

    READ MORE

  • Bermuda – Weed Control

    BASIC INFORMATION: Weed Identification Pictures General Turf and Weed Info Lawn Care Calendars THREE METHODS There are three primary methods of controlling weeds. Any one method, when used alone, will not usually control all of your weeds. To consistently control...

    READ MORE

  • Lawn – Timing Pre-emergent Herbicide

    One of the sourest phrases that can be directed at a child or adult is “I told you so!” Whether you touch a hot match, leave tools out in the rain or lift cinder blocks all afternoon, someone is usually...

    READ MORE

  • Crapemyrtle – Pruning

    One of the most confounding arguments I face is whether and how to prune crapemyrtles. They are mercilessly “murdered” by unaware landscapers and homeowners each winter… yet they still bloom in summer. Some people even believe a crapemyrtle won’t bloom...

    READ MORE

  • Bermuda Grass – Disease – Brown Patch

    Brown patch is most prevalent on bermudagrass which has been heavily fertilized when night temperatures are above 68 degrees and day temperature are above 80 degrees. Dead patches of grass may start small but can grow and join together to...

    READ MORE

  • Lawn – Growing in Shade

    OK. I admit it. I have given up. I came to the conclusion that grass just would not grow in the corner of my lawn near the ornamental cherry trees. The shade there is so dense that my grass, no...

    READ MORE

  • St. Augustine Grass Seed – Where to Buy

    Q: Please tell me where I can buy St. Augustine grass seeds. Our lawn has some now and we like it a lot, but we’re having trouble finding seeds. A: You can’t buy St. Augustinegrass seed. The plant is very...

    READ MORE

  • Lawn – Leveling

    A new home in my neighborhood had bermudagrass sod planted in March. By May, one area was a perfect checkerboard of straight lines, composed of weedy plants, surrounding the individual squares of sod. Evidently the sod installers were in such...

    READ MORE

  • RECENT ARTICLES
  • POPULAR ARTICLES

Heirloom Tomatoes – Sources

Georgia regulations make it tough for growers outside the state to ship live tomato plants into our state. You can grow tomatoes from seed, but many gardeners don’t want to go through the hassle of planning and caretaking. Fortunately, there...

READ MORE

Jerusalem Artichoke (sunchoke)

Helianthus tuberosus This tall, fall-flowering perennial sunflower is native to the United States, and was used by native Americans used it as a staple food. It grows into a somewhat invasive mass of stalks up to ten feet tall, with...

READ MORE

Swiss Chard

Beta vulgaris var. cicla Chard, more commonly called Swiss chard, is actually a beet that has been bred for leaves at the expense of the bulbous roots. Grown as a summer green, it is prepared like spinach. • More detailed...

READ MORE

Corn, Sweet

Zea mays var. rugosa Who can resist a steaming hot ear of fresh-grown corn on the cob? Being a native crop, it is more American as apple pie. Sweet corn was developed from common field corn. Field corn is harvested...

READ MORE

Cucumber

Cucumis sativus Cucumbers are vine crops that are closely related to squashes, pumpkins, and melons. They are warm-season plants known for their refreshingly mild fruits. Many kinds of cucumbers have been developed to satisfy the demands of different cuisines. Some...

READ MORE

Collards

Brassica oleracea var. acephala Collards are a mainstay of Southern vegetable gardens. The cool-season leafy vegetable is a super cold-hardy member of the cabbage family. Collards tolerate both warm and cold temperatures better than cabbage – in fact, collards are...

READ MORE

Cauliflower

Brassica oleracea var. botrytis A member of the mustard family, cauliflower and its close relatives are different varieties of Brassica oleracea, commonly called the cole crops. • More detailed information can be found in The Georgia Fruit & Vegetable Book...

READ MORE

Black Walnut

Juglans nigraBlack Walnut is native to North America and does well in the South in well-drained soil. Few gardeners plant them purposely but many may find one growing on property they purchase or inherit. • More detailed information can be...

READ MORE

Peanut

Arachis hypogaea Peanuts, sometimes called goober peas, pindars, earth nuts, and ground nuts, are among the richest vegetables for oil content. They grow in a most unique way: When the single-stem, bushy plants are mature, their low-growing branches produce yellow...

READ MORE

Pecan

Carya illinoensis The Pecan is a member of the Walnut genus but is more closely related to Hickories than Walnuts. Pecans were used by Native Americans at least 8000 years ago in Texas. • More detailed information can be found...

READ MORE

Black Walnut – Cracking

Q: I have a black walnut tree in my yard that has dropped copious amounts of nuts this fall. Is there an easy way to get the nut meats out of the hard shells? A: There is a small depression...

READ MORE

Lemongrass

Cymbopogon citrates taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Tender perennial. A native of India, Lemongrass grows in clumps 4 to 6 feet high. Leaves have a fragrance resembling the scent of lemons....

READ MORE

Mint

Mentha spp. taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Mints are easily grown perennial ground covers that are valued as flavorings in teas, ice cream, candies and gum. There are many varieties, each...

READ MORE

Angelica

Angelica archangelica Angelica is a tall biennial plant that acquired the name from its supposed ability to prevent or cure plague. People considered it a “guardian angel.” All parts of the plant are aromatic. Use the leaves in salads, add...

READ MORE

Anise

Pimpinella anisum Many herbs, including anise, are members of the Umbelliferae family. Anise is a native of the Mediterranean area and has been used as a flavoring and as a medicinal there for centuries. It has a flavor similar to...

READ MORE

Anise Hyssop

Agastache foeniculum Anise hyssop is a large perennial plant, a member of the mint family, with showy purple spikes that attract bees in abundance. The flavor and aroma are definitely licorice. The leaves are good for teas or garnishes. •...

READ MORE

Basil

Ocimum basilicum A very familiar and popular herb, Basil is the basis for pesto. Many cooks consider Basil the premier culinary herb. Every gardener needs at least 1 Basil plant to have the fresh leaves to toss into casseroles, sauces...

READ MORE

Caraway

Carum carvi Gardeners like caraway for the seeds, for the foliage and for the roots, which are used like parsnips. Caraway joins carrots, parsnips, angelica and anise as members of the Umbelliferae family. • More detailed information can be found...

READ MORE

Weeds – Identification with Pictures

Weed control in the landscape is a tough business. You have to know a lot about the weed in question just to get started! As in most situations, a picture is worth a thousand words. Go through the sites below,...

READ MORE

Diagnosing Holes in the Yard

Sometimes many heads are better than one when it comes to solving a problem. Wade Hutcheson, my Extension colleague in Spalding county, gets plenty of calls from the citizens of his area asking his help in identifying various holes in...

READ MORE

Brown Patch – Diagnosing

You have brown patches of dead grass in your lawn. Is it the common lawn disease ‘brown patch’ or is it something else? The answer is important: if it is brown patch you probably need to spray with a fungicide....

READ MORE

Bermuda – Weed Control

BASIC INFORMATION: Weed Identification Pictures General Turf and Weed Info Lawn Care Calendars THREE METHODS There are three primary methods of controlling weeds. Any one method, when used alone, will not usually control all of your weeds. To consistently control...

READ MORE

Lawn – Timing Pre-emergent Herbicide

One of the sourest phrases that can be directed at a child or adult is “I told you so!” Whether you touch a hot match, leave tools out in the rain or lift cinder blocks all afternoon, someone is usually...

READ MORE

Crapemyrtle – Pruning

One of the most confounding arguments I face is whether and how to prune crapemyrtles. They are mercilessly “murdered” by unaware landscapers and homeowners each winter… yet they still bloom in summer. Some people even believe a crapemyrtle won’t bloom...

READ MORE

Bermuda Grass – Disease – Brown Patch

Brown patch is most prevalent on bermudagrass which has been heavily fertilized when night temperatures are above 68 degrees and day temperature are above 80 degrees. Dead patches of grass may start small but can grow and join together to...

READ MORE

Lawn – Growing in Shade

OK. I admit it. I have given up. I came to the conclusion that grass just would not grow in the corner of my lawn near the ornamental cherry trees. The shade there is so dense that my grass, no...

READ MORE

St. Augustine Grass Seed – Where to Buy

Q: Please tell me where I can buy St. Augustine grass seeds. Our lawn has some now and we like it a lot, but we’re having trouble finding seeds. A: You can’t buy St. Augustinegrass seed. The plant is very...

READ MORE

Lawn – Leveling

A new home in my neighborhood had bermudagrass sod planted in March. By May, one area was a perfect checkerboard of straight lines, composed of weedy plants, surrounding the individual squares of sod. Evidently the sod installers were in such...

READ MORE