Featured Article

Weeds – Identification with Pictures

Weed control in the landscape is a tough business. You have to know a lot about the weed in question just to get started! As in most situations, a picture is worth a thousand words. Go through the sites below, then choose your method of weed control. Remember: healthy, vigorous...

READ MORE

“English Ivy Kills Trees” Sign – Who Places Them?

OK – my curiosity is killing me! Who puts up these signs at random spots around Atlanta? I’ve asked a number of arborists: No knowledge. I’ve posted it on Facebook; 21,000 people saw the post: lots of comments, but no answer. If you know, please email...

READ MORE

Come With Me to Cuba – Oct 2014

I get real pleasure from travelling with folks who like to see the world. Going to Callaway Gardens was a real trip when I was a kid! Now I get to see the corners of the globe with gardeners (and spouses!) on trips I plan and host each year. In...

READ MORE

UGA Vegetable Gardening Publications

With food prices high, folks have been thinking about growing some of their own food. Food gardening is not hard and it doesn’t have to take much room in your landscape. You can even do it in containers! These gardening publications are available on the Internet or ask for a...

READ MORE

Shrub – Pruning Calendar

The Home & Garden section of the Atlanta Journal and Constitution published a very nice pruning calendar several years ago. When viewed on a sheet of newsprint, it was gorgeous. When reduced to fit onto a sheet of typing paper it was impossible to read. I imagine you didn’t keep...

READ MORE

  • RECENT ARTICLES
  • POPULAR ARTICLES
  • Tree – Covering Exposed Roots

    D.S. recently sent me a question I have heard over and over again after heavy, eroding rains. “I have a maple tree whose roots are showing through the soil around it.” he wrote. “How much new topsoil should I put...

    READ MORE

  • The Science Behind Fall Leaf Color

    Pigments of Fall Color David C. Zlesak, Regional Extension Educator, Horticulture University of Minnesota Brilliantly colored leaves and fruit transform the fall landscape into enchanting scenes and is a hallmark of Minnesota and other Northern-tiered states. Heightened interest in plants...

    READ MORE

  • Sudden Oak Death (SOD)

    Sudden Oak Death (SOD) fungus could be a serious threat to oak trees in the Southeast. It has caused great damage to oaks in California. Several commonly grown woody plants (camellia, rhododendron, viburnum, etc) can be carriers of the disease,...

    READ MORE

  • Stone Mulch – Bad for Trees

    Norm Mittleider, owner of The Art of Pruning (770-407-1511) read my comments about using stone mulch in a landscape. He comments: “You could not have said it any better when addressing the question of using stone as mulch. I have...

    READ MORE

  • SOD Update from Dr. Woodward

    from Dr Jean Williams-Woodward April 9, 2004 By now most of you may have already heard that Phytophthora ramorum, cause of Sudden Oak Death (SOD), has been positively identified on plants within five Georgia nurseries: John Deere #173, College Park;...

    READ MORE

  • Sassafras – Planting

    I personally wish more gardeners would plant sassafras in their landscapes. I don’t think I have ever seen it offered at a nursery. If several were planted together, the fall color would be spectacular. The tree is touchy about being...

    READ MORE

  • Repairing a Broken Tree

    When storms break tree limbs it can be heartbreaking to survey the damage. Trees, however, are remarkably able to recover from damage if given a little help. This article from Michigan State University gives some great hints: Repairing Storm Damage...

    READ MORE

  • Pine Needle Cast Disease

    When pine needles turn reddish-brown in early summer, several things could be the cause. It could be beetles in the trunk, compaction damage to the roots or, occasionally, a needle disease. In the year after a wet summer, the disease...

    READ MORE

  • Pine Beetle Identification

    Pine trees are always subject to insect attack and should be examined periodically to determine if insect problems are developing. Several species of small brown or black beetles are common pests of pine trees. They are often referred to as...

    READ MORE

  • Osage Orange – Uses

    Garden friend D.G. has had much more experience with osage orange than most. His comments on the tree are below: “I grew up on a small general farm in west-central Illinois, where my father had about a quarter-mile row of...

    READ MORE

  • Identifying Insects, Plants and Animals

    My neighbor Chrissy has taught me more about the insects that live in my neighborhood than any adult possibly could have. Every couple of days there comes a short “Ding Dong” of our doorbell, followed by a couple of firm...

    READ MORE

  • Beekeepers – Finding

    There are many friendly beekeeping clubs scattered across Georgia. Most sponsor regular meetings and classes for beginners. Metro Atlanta Beekeepers Association Tara Beekeepers Association Cherokee Beekeepers Club Georgia Beekeepers Association Henry County Beekeepers Gwinnett Beekeepers...

    READ MORE

  • Hornworms – Determining Difference

    Taken from Hornworms and “Hummingbird” Moths The tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, is usually much more common in vegetable gardens than the tomato hornworm, Manduca quinquemaculata, but both may be found together as they generally have similar habits. The tomato hornworm...

    READ MORE

  • Woodpecker – Control

    V. C. called me in an agitated state. “A woodpecker is pecking holes in my kitchen window screen!”, she exclaimed. “What can I do to keep this bird from visiting me every morning?” This is the time of year when...

    READ MORE

  • Cat – Control

    Cats digging in a flower bed can be a confounding problem. There are no repellents that are really effective. When I offered radio advice on the subject, a listener added these comments: “I was listening to your show Saturday morning,...

    READ MORE

  • Chameleon – Feeding

    I had an interesting call this week – a fellow who raises chameleons needed to know how to culture fruit flies to feed to the reptiles. This is pretty far afield for the Extension Service – we can tell you...

    READ MORE

  • Moths – Control

    Few things are more disappointing than donning an expensive wool sweater, only to find that moths have been snacking on the threads for weeks. Reweaving is costly and patching is almost impossible. “If only I had checked on my clothes...

    READ MORE

  • Mole Control – Castor Oil

    Moles can be a real bother in a lawn. Many times the best control option is to mash down their tunnels with your shoe and forget about them. A commercial product which contains castor oil has appeared. Research results on...

    READ MORE

  • Weeds – Identification with Pictures

    Weed control in the landscape is a tough business. You have to know a lot about the weed in question just to get started! As in most situations, a picture is worth a thousand words. Go through the sites below,...

    READ MORE

  • Diagnosing Holes in the Yard

    Sometimes many heads are better than one when it comes to solving a problem. Wade Hutcheson, my Extension colleague in Spalding county, gets plenty of calls from the citizens of his area asking his help in identifying various holes in...

    READ MORE

  • Brown Patch – Diagnosing

    You have brown patches of dead grass in your lawn. Is it the common lawn disease ‘brown patch’ or is it something else? The answer is important: if it is brown patch you probably need to spray with a fungicide....

    READ MORE

  • Bermuda – Weed Control

    BASIC INFORMATION: Weed Identification Pictures General Turf and Weed Info Lawn Care Calendars THREE METHODS There are three primary methods of controlling weeds. Any one method, when used alone, will not usually control all of your weeds. To consistently control...

    READ MORE

  • Lawn – Timing Pre-emergent Herbicide

    One of the sourest phrases that can be directed at a child or adult is “I told you so!” Whether you touch a hot match, leave tools out in the rain or lift cinder blocks all afternoon, someone is usually...

    READ MORE

  • Crapemyrtle – Pruning

    One of the most confounding arguments I face is whether and how to prune crapemyrtles. They are mercilessly “murdered” by unaware landscapers and homeowners each winter… yet they still bloom in summer. Some people even believe a crapemyrtle won’t bloom...

    READ MORE

  • Bermuda Grass – Disease – Brown Patch

    Brown patch is most prevalent on bermudagrass which has been heavily fertilized when night temperatures are above 68 degrees and day temperature are above 80 degrees. Dead patches of grass may start small but can grow and join together to...

    READ MORE

  • Lawn – Growing in Shade

    OK. I admit it. I have given up. I came to the conclusion that grass just would not grow in the corner of my lawn near the ornamental cherry trees. The shade there is so dense that my grass, no...

    READ MORE

  • Lawn – Leveling

    A new home in my neighborhood had bermudagrass sod planted in March. By May, one area was a perfect checkerboard of straight lines, composed of weedy plants, surrounding the individual squares of sod. Evidently the sod installers were in such...

    READ MORE

  • St. Augustine Grass Seed – Where to Buy

    Q: Please tell me where I can buy St. Augustine grass seeds. Our lawn has some now and we like it a lot, but we’re having trouble finding seeds. A: You can’t buy St. Augustinegrass seed. The plant is very...

    READ MORE

  • RECENT ARTICLES
  • POPULAR ARTICLES

Tree – Covering Exposed Roots

D.S. recently sent me a question I have heard over and over again after heavy, eroding rains. “I have a maple tree whose roots are showing through the soil around it.” he wrote. “How much new topsoil should I put...

READ MORE

The Science Behind Fall Leaf Color

Pigments of Fall Color David C. Zlesak, Regional Extension Educator, Horticulture University of Minnesota Brilliantly colored leaves and fruit transform the fall landscape into enchanting scenes and is a hallmark of Minnesota and other Northern-tiered states. Heightened interest in plants...

READ MORE

Sudden Oak Death (SOD)

Sudden Oak Death (SOD) fungus could be a serious threat to oak trees in the Southeast. It has caused great damage to oaks in California. Several commonly grown woody plants (camellia, rhododendron, viburnum, etc) can be carriers of the disease,...

READ MORE

Stone Mulch – Bad for Trees

Norm Mittleider, owner of The Art of Pruning (770-407-1511) read my comments about using stone mulch in a landscape. He comments: “You could not have said it any better when addressing the question of using stone as mulch. I have...

READ MORE

SOD Update from Dr. Woodward

from Dr Jean Williams-Woodward April 9, 2004 By now most of you may have already heard that Phytophthora ramorum, cause of Sudden Oak Death (SOD), has been positively identified on plants within five Georgia nurseries: John Deere #173, College Park;...

READ MORE

Sassafras – Planting

I personally wish more gardeners would plant sassafras in their landscapes. I don’t think I have ever seen it offered at a nursery. If several were planted together, the fall color would be spectacular. The tree is touchy about being...

READ MORE

Repairing a Broken Tree

When storms break tree limbs it can be heartbreaking to survey the damage. Trees, however, are remarkably able to recover from damage if given a little help. This article from Michigan State University gives some great hints: Repairing Storm Damage...

READ MORE

Pine Needle Cast Disease

When pine needles turn reddish-brown in early summer, several things could be the cause. It could be beetles in the trunk, compaction damage to the roots or, occasionally, a needle disease. In the year after a wet summer, the disease...

READ MORE

Pine Beetle Identification

Pine trees are always subject to insect attack and should be examined periodically to determine if insect problems are developing. Several species of small brown or black beetles are common pests of pine trees. They are often referred to as...

READ MORE

Osage Orange – Uses

Garden friend D.G. has had much more experience with osage orange than most. His comments on the tree are below: “I grew up on a small general farm in west-central Illinois, where my father had about a quarter-mile row of...

READ MORE

Identifying Insects, Plants and Animals

My neighbor Chrissy has taught me more about the insects that live in my neighborhood than any adult possibly could have. Every couple of days there comes a short “Ding Dong” of our doorbell, followed by a couple of firm...

READ MORE

Beekeepers – Finding

There are many friendly beekeeping clubs scattered across Georgia. Most sponsor regular meetings and classes for beginners. Metro Atlanta Beekeepers Association Tara Beekeepers Association Cherokee Beekeepers Club Georgia Beekeepers Association Henry County Beekeepers Gwinnett Beekeepers...

READ MORE

Hornworms – Determining Difference

Taken from Hornworms and “Hummingbird” Moths The tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, is usually much more common in vegetable gardens than the tomato hornworm, Manduca quinquemaculata, but both may be found together as they generally have similar habits. The tomato hornworm...

READ MORE

Woodpecker – Control

V. C. called me in an agitated state. “A woodpecker is pecking holes in my kitchen window screen!”, she exclaimed. “What can I do to keep this bird from visiting me every morning?” This is the time of year when...

READ MORE

Cat – Control

Cats digging in a flower bed can be a confounding problem. There are no repellents that are really effective. When I offered radio advice on the subject, a listener added these comments: “I was listening to your show Saturday morning,...

READ MORE

Chameleon – Feeding

I had an interesting call this week – a fellow who raises chameleons needed to know how to culture fruit flies to feed to the reptiles. This is pretty far afield for the Extension Service – we can tell you...

READ MORE

Moths – Control

Few things are more disappointing than donning an expensive wool sweater, only to find that moths have been snacking on the threads for weeks. Reweaving is costly and patching is almost impossible. “If only I had checked on my clothes...

READ MORE

Mole Control – Castor Oil

Moles can be a real bother in a lawn. Many times the best control option is to mash down their tunnels with your shoe and forget about them. A commercial product which contains castor oil has appeared. Research results on...

READ MORE

Weeds – Identification with Pictures

Weed control in the landscape is a tough business. You have to know a lot about the weed in question just to get started! As in most situations, a picture is worth a thousand words. Go through the sites below,...

READ MORE

Diagnosing Holes in the Yard

Sometimes many heads are better than one when it comes to solving a problem. Wade Hutcheson, my Extension colleague in Spalding county, gets plenty of calls from the citizens of his area asking his help in identifying various holes in...

READ MORE

Brown Patch – Diagnosing

You have brown patches of dead grass in your lawn. Is it the common lawn disease ‘brown patch’ or is it something else? The answer is important: if it is brown patch you probably need to spray with a fungicide....

READ MORE

Bermuda – Weed Control

BASIC INFORMATION: Weed Identification Pictures General Turf and Weed Info Lawn Care Calendars THREE METHODS There are three primary methods of controlling weeds. Any one method, when used alone, will not usually control all of your weeds. To consistently control...

READ MORE

Lawn – Timing Pre-emergent Herbicide

One of the sourest phrases that can be directed at a child or adult is “I told you so!” Whether you touch a hot match, leave tools out in the rain or lift cinder blocks all afternoon, someone is usually...

READ MORE

Crapemyrtle – Pruning

One of the most confounding arguments I face is whether and how to prune crapemyrtles. They are mercilessly “murdered” by unaware landscapers and homeowners each winter… yet they still bloom in summer. Some people even believe a crapemyrtle won’t bloom...

READ MORE

Bermuda Grass – Disease – Brown Patch

Brown patch is most prevalent on bermudagrass which has been heavily fertilized when night temperatures are above 68 degrees and day temperature are above 80 degrees. Dead patches of grass may start small but can grow and join together to...

READ MORE

Lawn – Growing in Shade

OK. I admit it. I have given up. I came to the conclusion that grass just would not grow in the corner of my lawn near the ornamental cherry trees. The shade there is so dense that my grass, no...

READ MORE

Lawn – Leveling

A new home in my neighborhood had bermudagrass sod planted in March. By May, one area was a perfect checkerboard of straight lines, composed of weedy plants, surrounding the individual squares of sod. Evidently the sod installers were in such...

READ MORE

St. Augustine Grass Seed – Where to Buy

Q: Please tell me where I can buy St. Augustine grass seeds. Our lawn has some now and we like it a lot, but we’re having trouble finding seeds. A: You can’t buy St. Augustinegrass seed. The plant is very...

READ MORE