Featured Article

Upcoming Trips to Ireland and Cuba – 2014

I get real pleasure from travelling with folks who like to see the world. Going to Callaway Gardens was a real trip when I was a kid! Now I get to see the corners of the globe with gardeners (and spouses!) on trips I plan and host each year. We’re...

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UGA Vegetable Gardening Publications

With food prices high, folks have been thinking about growing some of their own food. Food gardening is not hard and it doesn’t have to take much room in your landscape. You can even do it in containers! These gardening publications are available on the Internet or ask for a...

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Roundup – Using on Winter Weeds

It is tempting to spray glyphosate (click for sources) on green winter weeds when your lawn grass is brown and dormant. However, bermudagrass is the only turfgrass on which I’d recommend this practice – - and with much caution. The bermudagrass must be completely dormant. Get on your hands and...

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Crapemyrtle – Pruning

One of the most confounding arguments I face is whether and how to prune crapemyrtles. They are mercilessly “murdered” by unaware landscapers and homeowners each winter… yet they still bloom in summer. Some people even believe a crapemyrtle won’t bloom unless it is severely pruned. Crapemyrtles do not HAVE TO...

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Buy Garden Books!

As you probably know, I am the author or co-author of several books about gardening in Georgia.  If you’d like to get one of my books for yourself or to give as a gift, click the link below. I’ll get the order immediately and will inscribe it as you wish...

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  • RECENT ARTICLES
  • POPULAR ARTICLES
  • Black Walnut

    Juglans nigraBlack Walnut is native to North America and does well in the South in well-drained soil. Few gardeners plant them purposely but many may find one growing on property they purchase or inherit. • More detailed information can be...

    READ MORE

  • Peanut

    Arachis hypogaea Peanuts, sometimes called goober peas, pindars, earth nuts, and ground nuts, are among the richest vegetables for oil content. They grow in a most unique way: When the single-stem, bushy plants are mature, their low-growing branches produce yellow...

    READ MORE

  • Pecan

    Carya illinoensis The Pecan is a member of the Walnut genus but is more closely related to Hickories than Walnuts. Pecans were used by Native Americans at least 8000 years ago in Texas. • More detailed information can be found...

    READ MORE

  • Black Walnut – Cracking

    Q: I have a black walnut tree in my yard that has dropped copious amounts of nuts this fall. Is there an easy way to get the nut meats out of the hard shells? A: There is a small depression...

    READ MORE

  • Lemongrass

    Cymbopogon citrates taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Tender perennial. A native of India, Lemongrass grows in clumps 4 to 6 feet high. Leaves have a fragrance resembling the scent of lemons....

    READ MORE

  • Mint

    Mentha spp. taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Mints are easily grown perennial ground covers that are valued as flavorings in teas, ice cream, candies and gum. There are many varieties, each...

    READ MORE

  • Angelica

    Angelica archangelica Angelica is a tall biennial plant that acquired the name from its supposed ability to prevent or cure plague. People considered it a “guardian angel.” All parts of the plant are aromatic. Use the leaves in salads, add...

    READ MORE

  • Anise

    Pimpinella anisum Many herbs, including anise, are members of the Umbelliferae family. Anise is a native of the Mediterranean area and has been used as a flavoring and as a medicinal there for centuries. It has a flavor similar to...

    READ MORE

  • Anise Hyssop

    Agastache foeniculum Anise hyssop is a large perennial plant, a member of the mint family, with showy purple spikes that attract bees in abundance. The flavor and aroma are definitely licorice. The leaves are good for teas or garnishes. •...

    READ MORE

  • Basil

    Ocimum basilicum A very familiar and popular herb, Basil is the basis for pesto. Many cooks consider Basil the premier culinary herb. Every gardener needs at least 1 Basil plant to have the fresh leaves to toss into casseroles, sauces...

    READ MORE

  • Caraway

    Carum carvi Gardeners like caraway for the seeds, for the foliage and for the roots, which are used like parsnips. Caraway joins carrots, parsnips, angelica and anise as members of the Umbelliferae family. • More detailed information can be found...

    READ MORE

  • Chamomile, German

    Chamaemelum nobile, Matricaria recutita Chamomile, sometimes called Roman chamomile, is a low-growing 4 to 6-inch tall perennial. German chamomile is a tall, erect, 3-foot annual. Both chamomiles are members of the composite (daisy) family and the flowers of both are...

    READ MORE

  • Chives

    Allium schoenoprasum taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Bookby Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Chives are perennial plants belonging to the Onion family that produce foot-tall clumps of hollow, upright leaves. Allowed to go to flower, they make mounds...

    READ MORE

  • Sage

    Salvia officinalis taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Sage is a hardy, semi-woody perennial plant that makes a loose shrub about 2 feet tall. The leaves are harvested and used fresh or...

    READ MORE

  • Parsley

    Petroselinum crispum taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Virtually everyone recognizes Parsley, a frequently-appearing garnish on plates served in restaurants. Parsley leaves are also used in various dishes, soups and sauces. Cooks...

    READ MORE

  • Chestnut

    Castanea spp. American Chestnut once grew throughout the Northeast, Midwest and Southern mountains. Farmers depended on the nuts to feed their families and livestock and they were a major part of forest animals’ diet. The rot-resistant lumber was used for...

    READ MORE

  • Cilantro/Coriander

    Coriandrum sativum taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Cilantro and Coriander are 2 stages of the same annual plant. The parsley-like foliage, which is picked before the seed stalk forms, is called...

    READ MORE

  • Salad Burnet

    Sanguisorba minor taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Salad burnet is a graceful perennial plant that forms a 15inch mound of compound leaves. The leaves taste and smell like fresh cucumbers and...

    READ MORE

  • Weeds – Identification with Pictures

    Weed control in the landscape is a tough business. You have to know a lot about the weed in question just to get started! As in most situations, a picture is worth a thousand words. Go through the sites below,...

    READ MORE

  • Diagnosing Holes in the Yard

    Sometimes many heads are better than one when it comes to solving a problem. Wade Hutcheson, my Extension colleague in Spalding county, gets plenty of calls from the citizens of his area asking his help in identifying various holes in...

    READ MORE

  • Brown Patch – Diagnosing

    You have brown patches of dead grass in your lawn. Is it the common lawn disease ‘brown patch’ or is it something else? The answer is important: if it is brown patch you probably need to spray with a fungicide....

    READ MORE

  • Bermuda – Weed Control

    BASIC INFORMATION: Weed Identification Pictures General Turf and Weed Info Lawn Care Calendars THREE METHODS There are three primary methods of controlling weeds. Any one method, when used alone, will not usually control all of your weeds. To consistently control...

    READ MORE

  • Lawn – Timing Pre-emergent Herbicide

    One of the sourest phrases that can be directed at a child or adult is “I told you so!” Whether you touch a hot match, leave tools out in the rain or lift cinder blocks all afternoon, someone is usually...

    READ MORE

  • Crapemyrtle – Pruning

    One of the most confounding arguments I face is whether and how to prune crapemyrtles. They are mercilessly “murdered” by unaware landscapers and homeowners each winter… yet they still bloom in summer. Some people even believe a crapemyrtle won’t bloom...

    READ MORE

  • Lawn – Growing in Shade

    OK. I admit it. I have given up. I came to the conclusion that grass just would not grow in the corner of my lawn near the ornamental cherry trees. The shade there is so dense that my grass, no...

    READ MORE

  • Bermuda Grass – Disease – Brown Patch

    Brown patch is most prevalent on bermudagrass which has been heavily fertilized when night temperatures are above 68 degrees and day temperature are above 80 degrees. Dead patches of grass may start small but can grow and join together to...

    READ MORE

  • Lawn – Leveling

    A new home in my neighborhood had bermudagrass sod planted in March. By May, one area was a perfect checkerboard of straight lines, composed of weedy plants, surrounding the individual squares of sod. Evidently the sod installers were in such...

    READ MORE

  • St. Augustine Grass Seed – Where to Buy

    Q: Please tell me where I can buy St. Augustine grass seeds. Our lawn has some now and we like it a lot, but we’re having trouble finding seeds. A: You can’t buy St. Augustinegrass seed. The plant is very...

    READ MORE

  • RECENT ARTICLES
  • POPULAR ARTICLES

Black Walnut

Juglans nigraBlack Walnut is native to North America and does well in the South in well-drained soil. Few gardeners plant them purposely but many may find one growing on property they purchase or inherit. • More detailed information can be...

READ MORE

Peanut

Arachis hypogaea Peanuts, sometimes called goober peas, pindars, earth nuts, and ground nuts, are among the richest vegetables for oil content. They grow in a most unique way: When the single-stem, bushy plants are mature, their low-growing branches produce yellow...

READ MORE

Pecan

Carya illinoensis The Pecan is a member of the Walnut genus but is more closely related to Hickories than Walnuts. Pecans were used by Native Americans at least 8000 years ago in Texas. • More detailed information can be found...

READ MORE

Black Walnut – Cracking

Q: I have a black walnut tree in my yard that has dropped copious amounts of nuts this fall. Is there an easy way to get the nut meats out of the hard shells? A: There is a small depression...

READ MORE

Lemongrass

Cymbopogon citrates taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Tender perennial. A native of India, Lemongrass grows in clumps 4 to 6 feet high. Leaves have a fragrance resembling the scent of lemons....

READ MORE

Mint

Mentha spp. taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Mints are easily grown perennial ground covers that are valued as flavorings in teas, ice cream, candies and gum. There are many varieties, each...

READ MORE

Angelica

Angelica archangelica Angelica is a tall biennial plant that acquired the name from its supposed ability to prevent or cure plague. People considered it a “guardian angel.” All parts of the plant are aromatic. Use the leaves in salads, add...

READ MORE

Anise

Pimpinella anisum Many herbs, including anise, are members of the Umbelliferae family. Anise is a native of the Mediterranean area and has been used as a flavoring and as a medicinal there for centuries. It has a flavor similar to...

READ MORE

Anise Hyssop

Agastache foeniculum Anise hyssop is a large perennial plant, a member of the mint family, with showy purple spikes that attract bees in abundance. The flavor and aroma are definitely licorice. The leaves are good for teas or garnishes. •...

READ MORE

Basil

Ocimum basilicum A very familiar and popular herb, Basil is the basis for pesto. Many cooks consider Basil the premier culinary herb. Every gardener needs at least 1 Basil plant to have the fresh leaves to toss into casseroles, sauces...

READ MORE

Caraway

Carum carvi Gardeners like caraway for the seeds, for the foliage and for the roots, which are used like parsnips. Caraway joins carrots, parsnips, angelica and anise as members of the Umbelliferae family. • More detailed information can be found...

READ MORE

Chamomile, German

Chamaemelum nobile, Matricaria recutita Chamomile, sometimes called Roman chamomile, is a low-growing 4 to 6-inch tall perennial. German chamomile is a tall, erect, 3-foot annual. Both chamomiles are members of the composite (daisy) family and the flowers of both are...

READ MORE

Chives

Allium schoenoprasum taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Bookby Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Chives are perennial plants belonging to the Onion family that produce foot-tall clumps of hollow, upright leaves. Allowed to go to flower, they make mounds...

READ MORE

Sage

Salvia officinalis taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Sage is a hardy, semi-woody perennial plant that makes a loose shrub about 2 feet tall. The leaves are harvested and used fresh or...

READ MORE

Parsley

Petroselinum crispum taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Virtually everyone recognizes Parsley, a frequently-appearing garnish on plates served in restaurants. Parsley leaves are also used in various dishes, soups and sauces. Cooks...

READ MORE

Chestnut

Castanea spp. American Chestnut once grew throughout the Northeast, Midwest and Southern mountains. Farmers depended on the nuts to feed their families and livestock and they were a major part of forest animals’ diet. The rot-resistant lumber was used for...

READ MORE

Cilantro/Coriander

Coriandrum sativum taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Cilantro and Coriander are 2 stages of the same annual plant. The parsley-like foliage, which is picked before the seed stalk forms, is called...

READ MORE

Salad Burnet

Sanguisorba minor taken from The Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Book by Walter Reeves and Felder Rushing Salad burnet is a graceful perennial plant that forms a 15inch mound of compound leaves. The leaves taste and smell like fresh cucumbers and...

READ MORE

Weeds – Identification with Pictures

Weed control in the landscape is a tough business. You have to know a lot about the weed in question just to get started! As in most situations, a picture is worth a thousand words. Go through the sites below,...

READ MORE

Diagnosing Holes in the Yard

Sometimes many heads are better than one when it comes to solving a problem. Wade Hutcheson, my Extension colleague in Spalding county, gets plenty of calls from the citizens of his area asking his help in identifying various holes in...

READ MORE

Brown Patch – Diagnosing

You have brown patches of dead grass in your lawn. Is it the common lawn disease ‘brown patch’ or is it something else? The answer is important: if it is brown patch you probably need to spray with a fungicide....

READ MORE

Bermuda – Weed Control

BASIC INFORMATION: Weed Identification Pictures General Turf and Weed Info Lawn Care Calendars THREE METHODS There are three primary methods of controlling weeds. Any one method, when used alone, will not usually control all of your weeds. To consistently control...

READ MORE

Lawn – Timing Pre-emergent Herbicide

One of the sourest phrases that can be directed at a child or adult is “I told you so!” Whether you touch a hot match, leave tools out in the rain or lift cinder blocks all afternoon, someone is usually...

READ MORE

Crapemyrtle – Pruning

One of the most confounding arguments I face is whether and how to prune crapemyrtles. They are mercilessly “murdered” by unaware landscapers and homeowners each winter… yet they still bloom in summer. Some people even believe a crapemyrtle won’t bloom...

READ MORE

Lawn – Growing in Shade

OK. I admit it. I have given up. I came to the conclusion that grass just would not grow in the corner of my lawn near the ornamental cherry trees. The shade there is so dense that my grass, no...

READ MORE

Bermuda Grass – Disease – Brown Patch

Brown patch is most prevalent on bermudagrass which has been heavily fertilized when night temperatures are above 68 degrees and day temperature are above 80 degrees. Dead patches of grass may start small but can grow and join together to...

READ MORE

Lawn – Leveling

A new home in my neighborhood had bermudagrass sod planted in March. By May, one area was a perfect checkerboard of straight lines, composed of weedy plants, surrounding the individual squares of sod. Evidently the sod installers were in such...

READ MORE

St. Augustine Grass Seed – Where to Buy

Q: Please tell me where I can buy St. Augustine grass seeds. Our lawn has some now and we like it a lot, but we’re having trouble finding seeds. A: You can’t buy St. Augustinegrass seed. The plant is very...

READ MORE