Food Gardening

UGA Vegetable Gardening Publications

With food prices high, folks have been thinking about growing some of their own food. Food gardening is not hard and it doesn’t have to take much room in your landscape. You can even do it in containers! These gardening...

READ MORE

Ray Givan’s Fig Page – Green and Yellow Fig Varieties

Several years ago I met fig expert Ray Givan and featured him on the “The Georgia Gardener” TV show. At that time he had a small website describing the figs he had grown. It was an invaluable resource to me....

READ MORE

Ray’s Givan’s Fig Page – Dark Fig Varieties

Several years ago I met fig expert Ray Givan and featured him on the “The Georgia Gardener” TV show. At that time he had a small website describing the figs he had grown. It was an invaluable resource to me....

READ MORE

Garden Success with Sweet Repeat Raspberry

I love getting garden success stories! Ernie F. Has a good one: I would like to share with you the success I’ve had in only one season with the Sweet Repeat raspberry, a new introduction from N.C.. I live in...

READ MORE

Watermelon – Choosing a Ripe One

It’s terribly disappointing to cut into a watermelon and find that it is still mostly pink inside and has little sweetness to the meat.  But what do you look for when choosing one at the grocery? How can you pick...

READ MORE

Blackberry – Cane Gall

Q: My wife noticed this on a blackberry. It looks like a fruit is growing from the cane. A: It’s a blackberry knot gall, caused when a tiny wasp inserts eggs on the blackberry cane. The wound causes the plant...

READ MORE

Pear – Grafting Using Super Glue

Mike A writes: I met you recently and told you about my experiment of trying to graft Bartlett onto Keiffer pear trees with Super Glue. You asked me to let you know how it worked. Apparently it works very well!...

READ MORE

Muscadine and Scuppernong – Pruning

A properly trained vine has a trunk, two arms and fruiting spurs. The first two years of training are devoted to developing the permanent trunk and fruiting arms. In the spring following planting, each plant will produce three or four...

READ MORE

Container Gardening – Vegetables

Though the trend now is to rent rather than own a home, the urge to grow your own food is still strong. Rather than dig a permanent garden plot, you can get great yields from containers on your patio, deck...

READ MORE

School Garden – Resources

If you’re a teacher or parent involved in setting up a school garden, you know there’s lots more to it than digging the dirt and planting some seeds. Do you have a good garden spot? When will you plant? What...

READ MORE

Vegetables – Cold Damage

Vegetable crops differ in their hardiness to cold temperatures, depending upon their genetics and origin. Warm season crops, such as tomatoes, snap beans, and the cucurbits originated in tropical areas and can be severely injured by even a light frost....

READ MORE

UGA Fruit and Nut Publications

Following are good UGA fruit and nut publications: Citrus Fruit for Southern and Coastal Georgia Experiments and Observations on Growing Mayhaws as a Crop in South Georgia and North Florida Home Garden Apples Home Garden Blueberries Home Garden Bunch Grapes...

READ MORE

Tomato – “Horns” and “Nose”

Over the years I have received several pictures of oddly-shaped tomatoes. They had “horns” and I couldn’t figure out why. Now Dr. Joe Kemble at Auburn University has finally laid it out for me: It is a physiological/genetic disorder. With...

READ MORE

June Garden Tips

Like fresh tomatoes but have little space? ‘Patio’ tomatoes grow in a 24-inch pot but give mouth-watering fruit! A half whiskey barrel makes an excellent container for a cherry tomato and three basil plants. Adorn cocktail toast with cheese, a...

READ MORE

Squash/Pumpkin/Cucumber/Watermelon Cross-Pollination – Explanation

I frequently receive from gardeners pictures of crazy-looking squash, cucumbers and gourds. Typically the plants  sprouted in a compost pile, from discarded fruit of the past year. The gardeners suspect cross-pollination is to blame for the odd shapes and they...

READ MORE

Rain Barrel – Using Water in a Vegetable Garden

Few things are cleaner than rain water, right? Well, in its pure state, rain water is clean. But coming off your roof into your rain barrel, it collects several pollutants that could be harmful. Water in your rain barrel might...

READ MORE

Fruit – Pruning

Winter and early spring are the best time to prune fruiting plants, whether trees, vines or bushes. The purpose of pruning is to train a plant to its strongest form and to get the correct ratio of leaves to developing...

READ MORE

Notes on Fire Blight Control from a Plant Pathologist

Notes on Fire Blight from Elizabeth L. Little, Assistant Professor – Homeowner IPM/Sustainable Agriculture, UGA The time to think about fireblight management using sprays is just before and during bloom, so late March may be too late for most trees....

READ MORE