Name that plant

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Details:
  • Date Photo Taken

    03 / 12 / 2015

  • Season Photo Was Taken

    Spring

  • Region Photo Was Taken

    Southeast

  • City

    Griffin

  • State

    Georgia

  • Posted by

    ceekay6174

Notes:

This plant faces west in my front yard. It has been trying to die for six years, but always manages to survive!

Comments

  • laura735 Master Identifier says:

    http://www.fillpots.co.uk/plantguide/plant/shrub/osmanthus-decorus

    January 13th, 2018 at 3:07pm

  • laura735 Master Identifier says:

    Hi Ceekay6174, It’s been a while and I wonder if you ever had the correct ID for your plant? If you had not, check out species and cultivars in the sweet olive/tea olive (Osmanthus) genus. These plants have the blue/dark purplish fruits. The included links below is for various cultivars in the group. Click on images to enlarge The second link is fruits of one its species. Best wishes! http://newplants.tripod.com/osma0016.html

    January 13th, 2018 at 3:31pm

  • Laura Unregistered says:

    I saw you post just now Ceekay6174. Thank you for the feed back. If your plant had blue fruits, I am afraid we are back to square one. Your plant might be a type of Mahonia eurybracteata (syn.M. confusa). Mahonia genus has blue fruits. Can you show the whole plant? And if possible the flowers as well. Is it an evergreen? Hopefully we can ID your mystery plant. It does have a very beautiful and interesting leaves.

    April 19th, 2015 at 10:04am

  • Ceekay6174 Unregistered says:

    Thanks a bunch, Laura. Now I can research the care and cultivation. It seems not to like that intense sun. I was going to have it dug up, but my husband protested. There were little blue berries on it one year. We are using it as a foundation plant at a rather high window. Thanks again. If you can share anything else, I would appreciate it.

    April 8th, 2015 at 1:13pm

  • Laura Unregistered says:

    Your plant looks very similar to Lance Leaf Aucuba (Aucuba japonica f. longifolia ‘Salicifolia’). From what I have learned, male and female flowers are born on separated plants. The red fruits will set on the female plant only if a male one is planted nearby.

    April 8th, 2015 at 10:05am

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